Improve your writing

6 Apr

spongebob writingThinking about how to improve your performance for the creative and non-fiction writing tasks for GCSE English Language? Look no further.

Start with your punctuation. You might be interested in these statistics from 2014. The average sentence length for students who achieved A* grades was 16.8 words per sentence. Grade C students averaged 17.7 words per sentence; Grade D students, 23.4; Grade F students, 28.3. Clearly using punctuation regularly and accurately is important!

If you want to show off your ability to use punctuation in a varied way, try the punctuation pyramid below. If the only punctuation you use in your creative and non-fiction writing comes from the top of the pyramid, you aren’t doing yourself any favours. The exam board want to see a ‘range’ of punctuation devices used. Aim for the bottom two rows:

punctuation

Not too confident about using semi-colons? Check out The Oatmeal’s handy guide – it’s weird, but you’ll remember it! How to use a semi-colon

It’s probably worth brushing up on your understanding of commas too:

comma rules

Another way to improve your writing is to improve your vocabulary. There are lots of resources online to help with this. Why not browse Pinterest or download a Word of the Day app? It’s also very helpful to read examples of other people’s writing (you’ll encounter a whole world of different vocabulary and ways to phrase ideas). Reading for just 20 minutes a day for a year means that you’ll be exposed to about 1.8 million words. Can’t hurt!

vocab builder

 

 

 

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